Controversial Study Suggests Link Between 5G Technology and COVID-19

A recent study published by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) claims that wireless communication radiation (WCR) from 5G technology could be contributing to the severity of COVID-19 cases. The study is stirring up a new debate, suggesting that exposure to the high-frequency radiation from 5G, which is being rapidly deployed worldwide, may be exacerbating the symptoms of the virus.

According to the study, 5G technology could be a significant factor in the spread of COVID-19, as cities and states with 5G infrastructure reportedly had significantly higher numbers of COVID-19 cases compared to areas without it. This fifth generation of wireless communications technology uses high-frequency bands and extensive bandwidths of the electromagnetic spectrum, including millimeter waves, which require a significant densification of infrastructure, including base stations and antennas that emit focused pulsed beams of radiation.

The study's authors argue that the potential health effects of WCR need to be considered before the public is potentially harmed. The new 5G infrastructure is expected to dramatically increase exposure to WCR, which has already been recognized as a form of environmental pollution and physiological stressor.

Despite the controversy, this research is likely to reignite the debate over the safety of 5G technology and its potential impact on human health. With the expansive rollout of 5G expected to accelerate in the coming years, more research is needed to determine the risks and benefits of this new technology. As the world continues to battle the COVID-19 pandemic, any potential contribution of 5G technology to the severity of the disease is sure to be a topic of continued discussion and investigation. To read the NIH study in full, click the link below.

Evidence for a connection between coronavirus disease-19 and exposure to radiofrequency radiation from wireless communications including 5G


Align Your Body. Align Your Life.